Best Snare Drums and Percussion for Beginners and Adults

Best Snare Drums For Sale Reviews

As a rule, when we talk about small drums, these are percussion instruments made of steel or wood, which were played with a pair of wooden sticks. They are usually part of an ensemble of percussion instruments to highlight the amazing beats, rhythm, tempo and resonance accompanying other instruments to create artistic harmony and melody, thus articulating a high-quality piece of music.

Most buyers interested in musical instruments pay special attention to the types of percussion instruments, so the purpose of this article is to help these significant customers purchase the right products at a reasonable price. After reading this review, you will get an idea of which products were the best-selling and which brands most customers bought.

For snare drums (for adults) you can visit these brands, namely Mapex, Ludwig and Drum Workshop Inc. On the other hand, you can try to take a look at these student kits, which include GP percussion, ADM ham and percussion.

A snare drum works as the core component, soul of a drummer’s signature sound. Especially in songs with a fast and upbeat tempo, it’s the snare drums that add life to the track. Whether it’s just a simple acoustic love ballad with a piano and drum loop, or jazz, hip-hop, or a rock track with intense frequential synergy going on, snare drums will do you wonders!

The standard-sized drum measures 14-inches and comes wrapped in a handsome metal finish. The padded, nylon backpack comes with shoulder straps and a carry handle to give you multiple carrying options (note: the snare weighs 13 pounds so it’s not exactly lightweight).

Contents
  1. Best Snare Drum for Beginners
  2. 1. Yamaha Stage Custom Birch Snare Drum
  3. 2. PDP Black Wax Maple Snare Drum
  4. 3. MAPEX MPX Series Maple Snare Drum
  5. 4. EASTROCK Snare Drum Set
  6. 5. GP Percussion SK22 Complete Student Snare Drum Kit
  7. 6. ADM Snare Drum Student Drum Set
  8. 7. Gammon Percussion Student Snare Drum Set
  9. Best Snare Drums for Adults
  10. 1. Mapex Hammered Steel Snare Drum
  11. 2. Ludwig Hand Hammered Black Beauty Snare Drum with Imperial Lugs
  12. 3. DW Drums Eco-X Snare Drum
  13. Best Snare Drums for Beginners Buying Guide
  14. Things to Consider When Buying a Snare Drum
  15. Genre
  16. Drumhead
  17. Tension Bolts and Lugs
  18. Shell Material
  19. Shell Depth
  20. Types of Snare Drums
  21. Drum Set Snare
  22. Tarol
  23. Orchestral Snare
  24. Marching Snare
  25. How Much Does a Good Snare Drum Cost?
  26. Tips for Teaching Snare Drum Basics
  27. Snare Drum Height
  28. Drum Set Up
  29. Find the Fulcrum on the Drumstick
  30. Teaching Matched Grip
  31. Building a Strong Foundation
  32. FAQ for Snare Drums and Percussion for Beginners
  33. What is a snare drum?
  34. What are the different types of snare drums?
  35. What does it sound like when a snare drum is hit?
  36. What are the different types of percussion instruments?
  37. How do I hold a snare drumstick and how long should it be?
  38. What are some different rhythms that people play on snare drums?
  39. Which percussion instruments should beginners learn first?
  40. What is the difference between a drum, a percussion instrument, and a drum set?
  41. How much does a snare drum cost?
  42. How many different sounds can be made by a snare drum?
  43. What is the difference between playing on a snare drum, and playing on a tom or bass drum?
  44. How do I use my hands to play on a snare drum?

Best Snare Drum for Beginners

In this review, we have compiled a list of the best snare drums in 2022 – we have carefully selected a list consisting of snare drums that are not only great for beginners, but also well suited for experienced musicians! And in case you are new to this, at the end of this article you will also find a buying guide that will help you choose a good snare drum for your drum kit, as well as tips for learning the basics of snare drum.

So, without further ado, let’s get down to business!

1. Yamaha Stage Custom Birch Snare Drum

The Yamaha Stage Custom Birch Snare Drum features a simple and classic design that will fit perfectly into any studio or live setup. It features an all-birch shell, ten lugs for more precise tuning, and 45-degrees bearing edges.

Design-wise, it sports an excellent hi-gloss lacquer finish and it’s available in five different colors! Its dimensions are 16.14″ x 16.14″ x 8.07″. It’s a killer YAMAHA quality for the money, a great choice for beginners, and we’re hands over sticks in love with it!

  • It’s available in five different finishes in case you want to pair it up with your personal drum kit
  • It comes with 10 lugs that help with more accurate tuning
  • It’s not a high-end snare, however, good for beginners and moderate players

2. PDP Black Wax Maple Snare Drum

This snare drum from PDP offers a fun look, is available in multiple sizes, and you can also order it along with drumsticks. The smooth finish on this snare drum is a hand-applied wax-based sealer that gives it an unrivaled, make-you-wanna-play-it right-away look!

Moreover, this snare drum comes with two-sided dual-turret lugs, true-pitch tension rods, brass inserts, DW mag throw-off, and tuning sequence heads. It’s a gig-ready, studio-kit-ready addition for anyone looking to get their hands on a snare drum with a little more cut!

  • It’s great for both experienced drummers as well as beginners – its sound will make you want to be a better drummer
  • It’s an impeccable product for a great price
  • It’s available in multiple sizes
  • Over-tuning may create excessive snare buzz

3. MAPEX MPX Series Maple Snare Drum

This snare drum is made of maple and features a simple design with quick locking lugs for better stability. If you’re looking for a deep-wood snare to fill your collection, this snare drum with 10 lug thin rims will be your jam!

Whether you’re into classic rock or metal, this will be your sweet powerful snare at an amazing price. When tuned tight and right, you’ll have no stick response loss – which is excellent. We’re in love with this snare drum – for an extra $10, you can pair it up with drumsticks and you’ll have all you need to be a part of the next drum circle! Whether you’re a beginner, an amateur drummer, or a whiplash-inspired dude, this snare drum will be a great bang for your buck!

  • It’s an 8″ x 14″ maple snare drum that is well-suited to play a variety of playing styles and genres
  • This snare drum has a deep throaty growl – fat sound
  • It’s a great snare for the $130 price
  • It doesn’t come with a stand and you’ll have to buy one to fit it into your existing kit
  • You may have to tune it again after every jam session

4. EASTROCK Snare Drum Set

This snare drum set comes with all the bare essentials – stand, sticks, practice pad kit, and drum keys. The drum measures around 14″ x 5.5″ with 20 wire sand bell and an all-steel cavity, offering a fuller, thicker sound!

It’s suitable for students, beginners, and professionals. Good for students because it comes with both the stand and a neckstrap as well, making it portable and easy to play! Made up of a thick drum barrel, imported drum skin, and solid drum circle.

  • It’s a complete snare drum set – make it a part of your existing kit or play it individually in your music class
  • If you’re a parent and unsure what to buy for your kid, this snare drum set is your answer
  • It comes with a unique backpack to conveniently carry it
  • The stand is only two-feet tall that may be a bit small for taller kids

5. GP Percussion SK22 Complete Student Snare Drum Kit

Surprise your children with a precious gift from GP Percussion and hone their skills when it comes to playing musical instruments. As early as today, give your child this amazing student instrument kit which already includes double-braced stand, sticks, manual, key, and nylon storage bag. It’s a great practice set ideal for 7 years old and above.

When it comes to its sound, it perfectly resembles a professional snare drum like the adult version and it can be used for Rock, Jazz, Latin, and Acoustic type of music. An awesome way to level up the musical instincts and knowledge of your child. Don’t hesitate to purchase this product since it was only offered at a standard reasonable price.

Special Features:

  • Shell – 14 inches
  • Lug – 10 inches
  • Height – 5.5 inches
  • Weight – 16 pounds
  • Extra Accessories – Sticks, Key, Rubber Practice Pad, Manual
  • Includes Double-Braced Stand
  • Made in the U.S.A.

6. ADM Snare Drum Student Drum Set

Start molding the potential skills of your child in terms of music and instruments. To have a hint when it comes to its features, the ADM student snare drum set was a great practice kit for your 3rd-grade to a 5th-grade child. It’s a quality beginner student drum with pad case sticks and stands included in its package. The professional look of the drum was inspired by its Hairline Nickel Finish.

As to its tones, it can produce perfect resonance and soft-sounding tone which was great for Jazz, Latin, Acoustic and even semi-rock style music. It can also be played during musical class lessons, live intermission numbers, school activities, club bands, and other personal musical practices. Check this product now to the trusted online shopping networks and get this at an affordable price.

Special Features:

  • Inspired by Hairline Nickel Finish
  • Shell – 14 inches
  • Height – 5 inches
  • Stand Height – 2.5 Feet
  • Weight – 13.7 pounds
  • Extra Accessories – Sticks, Key, Bag, Stand, Pad, Manual

7. Gammon Percussion Student Snare Drum Set

Do you prefer a plain stainless steel look of the snare drum to your kid? You may choose this Gammon Percussion’s instrument that comes with a chrome-plated drum, pad case sticks, double-braced stand, and Padded Cordura Nylon storage bag. It was recommended by most teachers due to its sound quality, durability, and versatility.

An amazing way to start improving the musical skills of your child using this percussion instrument. It can be purchased for an incredibly reasonable price for the entire package. For the ideal age, it can be played by 7 years old and above for a beginner’s practice. Get this musical instrument at an affordable price offered by Gammon Percussion.

Special Features:

  • Shell – 14 inches
  • Lug – 8 inches
  • Weight – 18 pounds
  • Extra Accessories – Sticks, Key, Padded Cordura Nylon Bag, Pad
  • Includes Double-Braced Stand
  • Made in China

Best Snare Drums for Adults

1. Mapex Hammered Steel Snare Drum

Grasp this amazing instrument that comes in an elegant masterpiece chrome finish look. This percussion delivers a neutral tone with focused mid-range, high crisps, and fat lows hence, it brings a drier sound with a touch of solid metallic crack. It can keep pace with light to heavy metal kind of music and rock.

What’s surprising about this instrument is the price. Yes, you can only get this at an affordable amount with furnished quality and awesome sounds already. It’s a practical choice for someone that looks for a budget-friendly side drum.

Special Features:

  • Built with Hammered Steel
  • Infused with Triple-Flange Hoops
  • Contains Remo UX Drum Heads
  • Polished with Chrome Finish
  • Fully Adjustable Throw-Off
  • Shell Dimension: 14 x 6.5 inches

2. Ludwig Hand Hammered Black Beauty Snare Drum with Imperial Lugs

Just merely looking at its fine and elegant black lustrous shell was already an awesome specification. To scrutinize this instrument further, it provides a tonal quality and sensitivity as to its rhythm, beats, tempo, and resonance.

When it comes to the hand-hammered brass, it affects the control of the resonance due to its brass characteristics. This might be pricey but it’s all worth it if you want to give it a try for a professional drumming experience.

Special Features:

  • Built with Hand Hammered Brass
  • Black Finish Lustrous Coat
  • Adjustable Throw-Off
  • Shell Dimension: 14 x 5 inches
  • Weight: 21 pounds

3. DW Drums Eco-X Snare Drum

Are you planning to own a wood-based snare drum? Well, this is something that you might get interested in. This Drum Workshop’s product features a hybrid bamboo birch shell construction and it can be mounted to suspended toms. The heads were furnished using the DW Drums of Remo USA and it manifests a true pitch tuning system. Moreover, the desert sand style of its appearance makes it look traditional and upbeat.

When it comes to its sounds, it provides a cutting high, warmth resonance, and cracking rim shots hence, it results in a full volume, full frequency, and full bottom end tones. Moreover, its bamboo specifications make the instrument more versatile and durable. The price of this instrument can be categorized in a mid-range but it’s a worthy investment to try due to its quality specs and function.

Special Features:

  • Built with Hybrid Bamboo Birch Shells
  • Desert Sand Style and Color
  • Constructed with True Pitch Tuning
  • Contains Suspension Tom Mounts
  • Infused with DW Heads by Remo USA
  • Shell Dimension: 14 x 5.5 inches
  • Weight: 13.4 pounds
  • Made in the U.S.A.

Best Snare Drums for Beginners Buying Guide

Most experienced and well-versed drummers will normally have more than a single snare drum – primarily because it’s the one that can define your sound the most.

However, this article is mainly targeted towards people who have a little-to-no experience with drums. Especially if you’re a parent and clueless about what to get for your child as a birthday gift, or maybe they just joined their school band and you’re planning to give them a headstart with a nice beginner snare drum.

We’ll make sure to hook you up with a plethora of information. Also, if you’re an aspiring drummer planning to grow over time, we’ve got a pretty versatile selection to make sure you don’t feel left out either. This section will help you choose a snare drum so you’re not fretting about what option to go for when you’re scouring through the products! So, without any further ado, let’s dig in.

Things to Consider When Buying a Snare Drum

Before you put a pin on that snare, there are a few things you can look into to ensure that a snare drum will do the job and grow over time. Here are a few things to get you going:

The size of the snare you should get comes down to the sound you’re planning to get out from it. If you want a huge growling sound out of it, you should get a 14″ inch snare with ample depth.

Similarly, if you’re planning to get a high cracking attack out of your snare, you should get a shallower one. Most snare drums are either 14″, 13″, or 12″ big. There are smaller ones out there that are considered Auxiliary snare drums.

Genre

Taking the genre into consideration isn’t something you should be worrying about at a beginner level. However, if you want your instrument to stay with you over time without having to invest again right after a few months, it’s best that you get your hands on a snare drum that helps you excel in your desired genre!

For instance, if you’re planning to play for a rock band or that’s the kind of music you dream to make, you should get a snare with a rich, high-cracking attack.

Drumhead

The drumheads are made of plastic or calfskin and they’re on both sides of your drum. The top one is called the “batter” head and you strike it to create a drum sound. The sound waves then go down, hit the “resonant” head to create that crisp snare sound.

A drumhead plays role in defining the signature sound of a snare as well – in addition to the depth and length of the snare.

Tension Bolts and Lugs

Drumheads are kept in place with the help of hoops that are further screwed with tension bolts and into the lugs that are attached to the shell. The higher the number of lugs in your drumhead, the tighter will be the tension on the snare’s surface, and the higher will be the pitch of the snare produced with it.

Shell Material

When it comes to sound, snare drums with wooden shells will produce a warmer sound as compared to metal ones. The most common types of wood used for this purpose is maple, birch, or mahogany. Maple produces the warmest, refined sound, birch goes for more of a well-blending and focused sound. Mahogany snares help produce a deeper sound.

On the other hand, drums made up of metal produce a sharp sound that pierces through the overall sound of a band.

Shell Depth

The depth of a drum can help you identify if it will have a high or low pitch. 5-inch deep shells will have a higher pitch as compared to a snare with 6.5-inch depth – the latter will blend and support the track well!

Types of Snare Drums

In case you decide to zero in on different types of snare drums out there, here are the principle types of snare drums:

Drum Set Snare

This snare is your famous, idiomatic snare used in jazz, pop, country, hip-hop, etc.

Tarol

A Tarol is very much like the drum set snare but has snare wires on the top head instead of the bottom head.

Orchestral Snare

The orchestral snare is also like your basic drum-kit snare but this one will always have a calfskin head instead of a plastic one.

Marching Snare

A marching snare has a nylon or gut drum head and produces a larger, resonant head sound. The loud drumbeat you hear during marches, that’s the marching snare.

How Much Does a Good Snare Drum Cost?

Most snare drums cost between $500 – $1000. The ones we’ve listed above, they’re all intermediate, beginner-level snare drums and cost below $500.

You may also find a snare drum costing over $1000 – that would either be a special model or a custom-made product. Snare drums cost a lot, it’s true – but they are well worth it, considering it’s the snares that you hit the most while drumming.

Tips for Teaching Snare Drum Basics

The snare drum is the foundational instrument for all percussion instruments. We learn technique and develop our hands while learning snare drum.

In a beginning band ensemble, the music director must teach all the instruments at the same time. They face the impossible task of teaching students how to get the first sound out of their instrument. This is a daunting task, especially for the non-percussionist educator.

I created this guide to help music educators — percussionists and non-percussionists — teach young students the proper snare drum technique. It is broken down into multiple sections, including setting up the snare drum, creating the grip and teaching the basic stroke.

Snare Drum Height

I have witnessed students just walk up to a snare drum and start playing. However, it is important to adjust the drum to the proper height so that the bead of the stick hits the drumhead at the optimal point. If the drum is not at the proper height, students will have tension in the shoulder.

Have students step back from the drum. Let their arms hang down the side of their body (they should not be holding drumsticks). Tell them to slowly lift their forearms at the elbow to a point that is comfortable. The angle of their arms will be approximately 110 degrees. The elbow should stay even with the body with space between their body and the elbow. Their body and arms should be relaxed and without tension.

Once this position is established, adjust the drum height to meet the end of the drumsticks. Remember to do this exercise away from the drum because you do not want the height that the drum is already set at to influence where students put their hands.

Drum Set Up

The snare drum should be set up so that the student is perpendicular to the snares (on the bottom of the drum), and the throw-off is closest to the player. If the student does not play over the snares, the sound will be thin, and snares will not vibrate clearly. Students should play over the snares to get the most snare response and characteristic sound of the snare drum.

Find the Fulcrum on the Drumstick

Creating a good fulcrum on the drumstick is one of the most important things we can teach a percussion student. Without a good fulcrum, it will be difficult to produce a good roll.

Tell students to use their dominant hand and put the drumstick inside the first knuckle of their pointer finger. They should position the drumstick so that approximately two-thirds of the stick is coming out the front of their hand. Let the drumstick drop and count how many bounces are created. Tell students to reposition the drumstick and try a different fulcrum. Again, have them count the number of bounces. If there are less bounces, students should move the drumstick the opposite way and see how many bounces are achieved.

The optimal fulcrum is when you find the position on the drumstick where you achieve the most bounces. Ask students to use a black felt-tip marker and draw a circle around the drumstick where the first knuckle of their pointer finger rests, so that they will know where to hold the drumstick. Once the optimal fulcrum is achieved, repeat this process with the students’ non-dominant hand.

Teaching Matched Grip

There are two grips that can be used on snare drum: matched grip or traditional grip. Because matched grip is used on snare drum, marimba, xylophone, timpani, bells and most percussion instruments in a concert ensemble, I have found that it’s best to start a student on matched grip.

Once students have marked the fulcrum on the drumstick, tell them to take their thumb and put it opposite the first knuckle of their pointer finger. The thumb must be parallel to the drumstick. Once students have the fulcrum, the back of the drumstick touches the love line on their palm as it goes out of their hand. Students should then wrap the other fingers loosely around the drumstick. They should not squeeze or clench the drumstick. Their hand should be relaxed, and there should be no tension in the hand or in the fingertips.

Building a Strong Foundation

Once students have adjusted the height of the drum, are standing perpendicular to the snares, have marked their fulcrum and have proper matched grip, it’s time to play. Have students bring the tips of the drumstick to the center of the drumhead. (Note: On a snare drum, I suggest that students play approximately one inch above the center of the drumhead).

The drumsticks should create a “V” with the tips of the drumsticks, and the angle should be approximately 60 degrees. Using the wrist, students should bring the drumsticks up eight inches above the drum. Drop the drumstick and return it to the original starting point. This is a full stroke.

At the beginning of every class, go over this quick checklist:

  • Step back from the drum. Bring up the arms to determine the height of the drum.
  • Step up to the drum and set the height.
  • Set the snare drum so the player is perpendicular to the snares and the throw-off is closest to the player.
  • Create a good fulcrum by finding the spot on the drumstick where you get the most bounces.
  • Place the thumb on the drumstick opposite the first knuckle of the pointer finger. The thumb should be parallel to the drumstick. Do not squeeze.
  • Bring your drumsticks to the drum and create a V the with tips of the drumsticks.
  • Using your wrist, bring the tip of your drumstick eight inches above the drum. Drop the drumstick and return it to the original starting point.

A solid foundation is the key to learning any new technique or method. Remember that haste in learning music is a “bad adviser” – the main thing is not to rush and move slowly. You have to think carefully about every even minor detail. After all, strengthening these small details will help to create a solid foundation.

FAQ for Snare Drums and Percussion for Beginners

What is a snare drum?

A snare drum is a type of percussion instrument. It is a cylindrical drum that has metal wires stretched across the inside of the drum, which are struck by the player’s hands.

What are the different types of snare drums?

Snare drums are a type of percussion instrument. They use the tension of their wires to produce a sharp sound. There are many different types of snare drums, which have different shapes and sizes.

The most popular type of snare drum is the marching snare drum, which has a cylindrical body and wire that is stretched across it. The other types of snare drums include the American-style bass drum, the German-style bass drum, and the Chinese-style bass drum.

What does it sound like when a snare drum is hit?

When a snare drum is hit, it produces a distinctive sound. The timbre of the sound is determined by the material the drum is made out of.

A snare drum has two types of metal rods that are struck with sticks to produce sound. The first type of metal rod is called the head and it is attached to one end of the drum’s shell. The second type is called the rim and it wraps around both ends of the shell.

When a snare drum head hits another head, it produces a high-pitched, sharp tone because there are many small holes in its surface. When a snare drum rim hits another rim, it produces a deep tone because there are fewer holes in its surface and so less air passes through them when they collide.

What are the different types of percussion instruments?

There are many types of percussion instruments that are used to provide rhythm and sound. Some of the most common types of percussion instruments are drums, cymbals, tambourines, and maracas.

How do I hold a snare drumstick and how long should it be?

There are many different ways to hold the drumstick, but in general, you want your fingers to be wrapped around the stick and you want your thumb to be on top of the stick. The length of the stick depends on what kind of snare you have.

What are some different rhythms that people play on snare drums?

There are many different rhythms that people can play on snare drums. Most of these rhythms are driven by the number of strokes taken per beat. The two most common rhythms that people use are a 2-stroke and 4-stroke rhythm. There is also a 3-stroke rhythm, but it is used less often.

The 2-stroke rhythm is played with the left hand and the right hand on the same head of the drum. The 4-stroke rhythm is played with one hand on each head of the drum and is often used when playing jazz music.

Which percussion instruments should beginners learn first?

Beginners should start with the most basic percussion instruments and work their way up.

The drums are the most important of all percussion instruments. They come in many varieties, such as the snare drum, bass drum, and conga drums.

The snare drum is a cylindrical drum with a head at one end that is held in tension by a metal snare wire strung over its edge. It is played by striking its head with sticks or fingers.

The bass drum is an oval-shaped drum that produces low-pitched sounds and has a metal hoop around it to hold the tension of the head while it’s being played.

The conga drums are traditional Latin American percussion instruments that have between three and five small metal discs on their heads, which produce different sounds.

What is the difference between a drum, a percussion instrument, and a drum set?

Drums are often categorized into three types: a drum, percussion instrument, and a drum set. The difference between the three is that the drum is typically played with a stick while the percussion instrument is played with mallets or sticks.

The drum set is made up of several different drums. The kit usually consists of at least two to four drums and cymbals.

How much does a snare drum cost?

There are many different types of snare drum that cost varying amounts. Some of them are more expensive than others.

The average cost for a snare drum is $125.

How many different sounds can be made by a snare drum?

A snare drum is a percussion instrument that produces a sharp and distinct sound.

The snare drum can produce many different sounds depending on the way it is played. There are three types of sounds that can be made by the snare drum:

  • The first sound is the “clicking” sound, which is produced by striking the rim of the drum with either your index or middle finger.
  • The second type of sound is called “tapping.” This type of sound can only be produced when you are playing on a tambourine or cymbals.
  • The third type of sound is called “thumping.” This type of sound can only be produced when you are playing on a bass drum or tom tom.

What is the difference between playing on a snare drum, and playing on a tom or bass drum?

The difference between playing on a snare drum, and playing on a tom or bass drum is that the snare drum has a single head, while the other two drums have multiple heads. The snare drum is typically played with an open hand, while the other two drums are played with the fingers.

How do I use my hands to play on a snare drum?

The player places their hands on either side of the top of the shell, and then strikes both hands together with their fingers extended and thumbs folded over to form a “drumstick”. The left hand strikes the head (or “top”) and right hand strikes the rim (or “bottom”).

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