Orange Amp Bundle

рисунок 3 Reviews

One of the greatest guitar brands in history, Orange are used by a vast array of rock artists. Their mid range is powerful and the basses stand out, thanks to its unique fuzzy sounds. And you can’t forget about their higher gain tones – they’re just one of the many reasons that Orange Amps are a force to be reckoned with.

History of Orange Amps

Orange Amps has been in business for 48 years, originally starting out in a basement in London before moving to their current location. They’re still run by Cliff Cooper.

Cliff had humble beginnings with his shop in London but was armed with the knowledge and hunger to succeed. But because it was such a small company, dealers wouldn’t buy into the concept. This meant he had to bring production in-house which is what helps make.

Cliff adamantly prioritized valves over transistors back then. The amps were made from orange material and so stood out – they make great combo with Les Paul guitars. This was a happy accident and lead them to become instantly recognisable.

After years of touring around the world, bands like Oasis, Jimmy Page and Black Sabbath have really cemented orange amps on stages everywhere.

Orange has been around since the 60s and managed to survive changing times over the decades and is still going strong. In the 80s, digital amps became popular and solid state amps fell out of favour for a bit. They came back big in the 90s though during rock’s brief revival which boosted them even further!

They were first up with the Lunchbox amp head – it’s a small amplifier without the need for mains power and is perfect for guitarists on the go.

Series Orange Amps

Orange is a leading brand which produces a range of amps throughout the world, so there’s always something that suits you in your price range and playing style. These Rockerverbs and Thunderverbs have plenty of gain and power on tap. The smaller Crush amps are great if you want a practice amp, but the 120C can easily handle gigs too.

For those who don’t want the huge Terror amp in their bedroom, there are two smaller versions of it – the Micro Terror and the Micro Dark. They pack just as much punch too.

Oranges don’t only make guitar amps either. Their bass amps have a distinctive fuzzy sound and their pedals are built like tanks, perfect for tours. But they also give you quality tones.

Best Orange Amps on the Market in 2022

Orange amps have always been really good. I personally think it’s because they are different and sorta sound like you’re playing through a blender. Nowadays I might be tempted to use the word “iconic” but still- “unique” is probably more accurate. Cool. I’ve been using them personally since the 1980s and currently own 2 – a red one and a blue one. They’re both terrific, they just sound and look fantastic

1. Orange Micro Crush Mini Combo

The Micro Crush Mini Combo is best suited for beginners who are looking for their first amp, or if you’re after a sound that’ll be good quality but are on a budget. It must have been difficult for Orange to squeeze their big amp tones into the Micro Crush but they managed it without sacrificing any quality! It sounds just as good as its bigger brother and it is even [sleek/pretty]. It’s really worth the price.

They also share the same classic styling, with their Basket Weave front grille and signature Orange picture frame edging.

Pros:

  • An authentic Orange tone from an incredibly compact size.
  • Built-in tuner.
  • Battery powered so you can take it anywhere.

Cons:

  • The 3-watt amp won’t get as loud as other options, but that’s understandable.
  • No AC adapter is included so make sure you have one before use. It can either be powered by the batteries or by a purchased power supply.

2. Orange Crush 12

Even if you’re not playing in stadiums yet, the Crush 12 is a nice amp to have. And unlike its competitors at this level, it’s not just a modelling amp. You get 12 watts of 100% pure single-ended signal, which sounds incredible, really better than any modelling.

New CabSim technology means that you can plug the output from the amp directly into your headphones or a recording device. And produces a cool sound that’s similar to putting a microphone in front of an amplifier cabinet. It’s cool to mess around with.

Pros:

  • Great sound for the affordable price.
  • 100% pure analogue signal path.
  • Headphone output with CabSim technology.

Cons:

  • It has a single channel, but that’s really not much of an issue if you’re using it for practicing.
  • If you’re touring soon and are on the market for a new amp, try looking at some Crushed or CrushedTwenty or CrushedThirty.

3. Value for Money Choice – Orange Micro Dark Head

The Micro Dark Head is the latest version of the popular Orange Micro Terror Head, sharing its intuitive Shape control. It sounds great, with a wonderful crunch from the 12AX7 valve used in its hi-gain preamp.

It has a hole range of tones that work wonderfully on most tracks. I think it is especially good for metalheads and the sound is clear and clean even when you crank it up.

This amp is a great beginner’s amp, it’s versatile and perfect for switching between different venues like the studio or at home. It’ll also sound good with any cab: a PPC108 cab for smaller settings, or a 4×12 for bigger venues. And the best thing about its tone is that it’s high-quality without costing much money.

Pros:

  • The sound and the amazing value for money.
  • Headphone output with CabSim technology.
  • Transparent fully buffered effects loop.

Cons:

  • It’s small so it doesn’t look as manly.
  • Single channel so you have to use it ‘dirty’ all the time or clean with a pedal which wastes that beautiful ‘dirtiness’.

4. Orange Rockerverb 50 MKIII

The new Orange PR50 MKIII is a twin channel, 50 watt head with a class A/B amp design. This amp carries on the tradition of the popular Rockerverb amps and offers all the flexibility, good sounds, and incredible power you would hope from live or studio performance.

The all-valve guitar amplifier from Tonic allows you to choose from top-notch clean tones, ‘classic’ British amp distortion, and the most heavy & saturated sound possible. And it does this beautifully. Valve-driven springs are an old reverb technique that is becoming increasingly popular again. We’ve seen a large improvement in the reverb type’s range too.

Rockerverb is designed for guitarists and has loads of features that are up to date with what guitar players are looking for. It sounds amazing, it’s got a high-end look and vibe and is still more affordable than comparable amps.

Pros:

  • Great sounding amp with superb versatility.
  • Dual Channel.
  • The Output power of this model can switch from 50Ws to 25W.

Cons:

  • You can’t go wrong with the prices on these pants, it’s just the only downside I see.

5. Orange CS50 Custom Shop

If you’re the discerning type who wants to own a hand-wired, no-nonsense premium guitar head, the CS50 is made for you.

This amp has no frills, just one channel, 4 valves, and 50 watts. The Minilogue is a semi-modular synthesizer, meaning that it has a bunch of parts you need to assemble and configure to create unique sounds. The interface is a little basic and the sounds can’t be tweaked too much, but with some patience you can produce pretty varied instrument tones.

The CS50 is a very minimal amp with no reverb or effects loop. But if you need either of those, check out the Rockerverb 50 MKIII. The point here is that the Custom Shop 50 was not designed to have any of these and that’s what makes it special – it’s just an excellent amp in its own way. If you want to experience the superior tone that an Orange guitar can produce, then we recommend the CS50.

Pros:

  • No-compromise design.
  • The sounds you get from an amp are usually best with a rock tone.
  • I’ve always wanted a hand-wired amp and this one seemed like a good option for the price.

Cons:

  • Single Channel, but what a channel!
  • No effects loop.

Buyer’s Guide

Speaker Size and Configuration

The size, weight and sound of your amp depend on what speakers you have. If you want a loud, powerful sound then might want to consider buying a 12-inch speaker combo with 4 speakers because it will likely be less expensive than smaller combos, but heavier.

There are five common speaker combinations: 1×10, 1×12, 2×12, 4×10, 4×12. The first number indicates the number of speakers and the second number denotes the width of speakers in inches.

Orange amps have that characteristic crunchy sound, but it’s not too good if you’re practising at home and set the gain too high by accident. The more powerful your amp and the more speakers it has, the harder it will be to get good sound at lower volumes.

You might be better off with a smaller amp that still has plenty of power but smaller speakers. This will allow you to practice at louder volumes without hurting your ears. Then you can move on to bigger amps, which are more suited to bigger concerts as time goes on.

When you’re buying an amp, don’t just focus on what your budget can afford- think about how you will use the thing and what how it will affect the sound. Owning a 100-watt amp and 4×12 speakers is great. But if you’re only ever going to use it in your bedroom, you’ll get better sound from a smaller 15-watt amp.

Valve vs. Solid-State Amps

The original Orange models from the 60s were all valve (or tube) powered, they were noted for their distinctive, warm sound. But valve amps do have some drawbacks: they don’t hold up as well over time and are less reliable.

Solid state amps are made with diodes and transistors, which usually results in better reliability than valve amps. They also have many less moving parts so they cost less to maintain or fix if they break.

Which type of amplifier is best is very subjective. The early solid state amps sounded terrible, but the technology has improved beyond belief since then, and as a result a lot of the modern solid state amps sound fantastic. But they don’t sound like valve amps. Some people try to replicate that sound, but it can’t be done without valves.

It’s strange how Orange, amongst others, still makes valve amps. The reason is that even though they are less reliable, cost more and need a lot of maintenance work for example, one positve outweighs them all: nothing sounds as good.

Conclusion

Any of these options are amazing, I can make you a promise that you won’t be let down. It’s important to do some research and find the one that best suits your needs.

Just go and buy one, then you can enter a wonderful, magical, sonic world where everything looks and sounds Orange. Unless of course you buy a black  colored Orange but I’m sure you get my point.

FAQ for Orange Amp Bundle

What is the guitar Orange Amp?

This is a high quality guitar amp that was created by the company Orange. It is one of the most popular amps in the world because it is so versatile. It can be used for any genre of music and it has a lot of features to help you get the sound that you want.

Below are some features that this amp offers:

  • It has two channels (clean and dirty)
  • A three band EQ with sweepable mid frequency
  • A digital reverb with level control
  • A bright switch for added high end or low end presence

Is the Orange Amp Bundle for beginners guitarists?

The Orange Amp Bundle is designed for beginners. It is a great way to get started with guitar playing and the different styles of music.

The amp bundle includes an amp, headphones, a cable and a strap. The amp has two channels which are clean and overdrive. It also has four EQ settings: bass, mid, treble and presence.

How much does the Orange Amp Bundle cost?

The Orange Amp Bundle costs from $99.

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